Dive

Poor Bills

840 N. Kansas Ave., Topeka

Pull up to the bar and chat up the locals by the soft glow of neon bar signs. Poor Bill's offers daily specials from its full bar. The White Russians are especially popular, but pale in comparison to beer's draw.



CW Porubsky Grocery and Meats

508 N.E. Sardou Ave., Topeka

A Topeka classic where time stands still. Porubsky's has the same weathered bar signs and packs the same lunch crowd ranging from the everyday worker to governor. Chili season -- from October to April -- marks the start and end of winter for many, and a county judge is among the servers. The founder's son, Charlie, runs things now, and serves up beer from bottles, cans and kegs.



Pizza Parlor

1919 N.E. Seward Ave., Topeka

Little changes at this no-frills joint frequented by Oakland locals. Don't be fooled by the name "Pizza Parlor." Bill Domme serves just about anything. "If you can't find something on the menu to eat," he says, "you're not hungry." He serves a more limited offering of drinks. The Parlor offers 3.2 beer -- mostly domestic stuff but some imports, too. Wine coolers as well.



The Den

1116 N.W. Lower Silver Lake Road, Topeka

Marriage didn't work out for Sue and Willie Artzer, but the private club the ex's opened in 1984 has lasted. Willie died in 1999, and Sue now runs The Den -- a place she calls "down-home country, probably one of the last honky-tonks." Look for live, local country bands on Fridays and Saturdays. Locals fill the place the rest of the week.



Boobie Trap Bar

1417 W 6th, Topeka

Known by regulars as The Trap, this dimly lit place, with beat up floors and worn wooden fixtures, give the impression this place has been thoroughly used and enjoyed by its patrons for years. Live bands perform on the main floor while customers play pool on the second floor. Bartender Elaine Appelhanz says life at The Trap is "awesome," people of all walks of life are welcome.



Sasnak North

1834 NW Topeka Blvd, Topeka

Owner Irvin Metz, who opened Sasnak North in 1952, likes to keep it simple: Hire attractive dancers, sell 3.2 beer and wine coolers, offer free hot dogs and have a good time. "We're like your neighborhood bar -- with dancers," an employee said. "We're very friendly here."



The Spot Tavern

2202 S.W. Buchanan St., Topeka

Nothing extravagant here. Just a dependable watering hole where Bud, Bud Light, Miller Light and Pabst Blue Ribbon (all 3.2 beer) is served from behind a 20-foot long wood bar. Early hours make it a good place for shift-workers to kick back after a long night of work. But you also might run across students from nearby Washburn University who are blowing off steam after a test.



Ichabod Laundra Bar

1501 S.W. 21st, Topeka

The only place in town where you can kick back with a cold one while your clothes run through the cold cycle. The Ichabod Laundra Bar, around since 1988, is a unique place to wash clothes and drink beer. New owner Jason McDaneld hopes to improve and expand the bar in the future. Change for laundry available. The place has more than a dozen washers and driers in different sizes.



Dutch Goose Sports Bar & Grill

3203 SW 10th Ave., Topeka

Rich in character, The Dutch Goose has been a Topeka tradition for more than 70 years. Frank Butler opened The Dutch Goose on S.W. 10th Street in the 1930s. It is the oldest continuously operated bar in Topeka. Decor includes signs for Rock Chalk Jayhawk and Powercat Alley, the Carpenters & Millwrights Union and the Plumbers & Steamfitters Union.



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